Teenagers do not consume enough fiber, according to new research

Why fibers are good for you

US researchers believe that increasing the amount of fiber consumed by teenagers could lower their blood pressure, blood sugar and insulin resistance.

Fibers are essential for the functioning of our body. They regulate transit, play a major role in satiety and satiation, maintain the balance of intestinal flora and prevent colorectal cancer, heart disease, obesity and diabetes. They are found in most foods, such as fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts… Yet, according to a US study, most teenagers consume much less fiber than recommended.

In the United States, the recommended minimum daily amount is 38 g for men and 25 g for women. Of the 754 adolescents interviewed for the study, only 2 of them consumed these amounts. On average, participants consumed 10.9 g per day, say the researchers in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition published in December 2018. Blood pressure, blood sugar and insulin resistance – the hormone that converts sugars in the blood into energy – participants were also tested.

The researchers looked at the two types of fiber we need in our diet. Insoluble fiber, found in cereals, nuts, fruits and vegetables. And soluble fiber, present in beans, oats, barley and avocados. As a result of their research, the scientists concluded that increasing the intake of both types of fiber to the recommended amount of 38 g could result in a decrease in blood pressure, blood glucose, and insulin resistance.

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“Teenagers probably lack a lot of fiber in their diet because they consume too much processed food and not enough whole grains, fruits and vegetables,” says Dr. Margo Denke interviewed by Reuters Health.

Read on the same subject: Dietary Fiber Can Help With Chronic Inflammatory Joint Disease

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Paige Driessen

Paige is an Arizona native who loves the outdoor life. She writes about a wide range of topics for The Talking Democrat