Roman era gold discovered in Italy

This treasure dating from the fifth century, discovered during excavations in the old Cressoni theater, Como, could be worth millions of euros. “We do not yet know in detail the historical and cultural significance of this discovery but this area is a real treasure for our archeology,” said Minister Alberto Bonisoli

Hundreds of gold coins from the end of the Roman Empire were found this week on the site of an old theater in Como, northern Italy, announced the Ministry of Culture. The rooms date back to the 5th century and were in a kind of stone amphora in the basement of the Cressoni theater, near the site of the forum of the ancient city of Novum Comum.

This theater, inaugurated in 1870, transformed into a cinema at the beginning of the 20th century and then closed in 1997, was to be completely demolished to allow the construction of a luxury residence. The container was discovered in the basement during excavations accompanying the digging of a basin of water intended for the fight against fire.

“We do not yet know in detail the historical and cultural significance of this discovery but this area is a real treasure for our archeology,” said Minister Alberto Bonisoli on Facebook. According to the Italian press, the coins could be worth millions of euros and the authorities plan to suspend the site for further excavations, no one can exclude the presence of other valuables. According to Italian law, the objects thus discovered belong to the public domain, even if the owner can ask for a percentage.

Shakes Gilles

Editor of The Talking Democrat. He enjoys bike riding, kayaking and playing soccer. On a slow weekend, you'll find him with a book by the lake.