Taking antibiotics increases the risk of developing kidney stones

US pediatric researchers found that children and adults treated with certain antibiotics had a greater risk of developing kidney stones. This is the first time that these drugs are associated with this disease.

Research had already shown that kidney stones were favored by a change in intestinal and urinary flora. Antibiotics modify this flora. Researchers at the Pediatric Hospital in Philadelphia wanted to know if certain antibiotics could increase the development of kidney stones. The results of their study appeared in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

One in five antibiotic prescriptions is useless

Gregory E. Tasian, pediatric urologist who conducted the study, said in a statement that the overall prevalence of kidney stones has increased 70% over the last thirty years, with particularly strong increases in teenagers and young women. But it was previously something very rare in children. Antibiotics, prescribed more often in children, may play a role in this increase.

Renal calculations related to 5 families of antibiotics

The research team relied on 13 million electronic health records of children and adults in the United Kingdom, seen by general practitioners between 1994 and 2015. They analyzed the previous exposure for almost 26,000 patients who suffered from kidney stones, along with 260,000 control subjects. Of the 12 antibiotic classes studied, 5 were found to be significant in relation to the diagnosis of the disease:

  • The sulfonamides
  • Cephalosporins
  • Fluoroquinolones
  • Nitrofurans
  • Broad Spectrum Penicillins

Patients who received sulfonamides were 2 times more likely to develop kidney stones. For the broad-spectrum penicillins, the risks were increased by 27%. These risks were more visible in children and adolescents.

Angie Mahecha

Angie Mahecha, an Engineering Student at the University of Central Florida, is originally from Colombia but has been living in Florida for the past 10 Years.